Ginger Lemongrass Tea – Hot or Cold!

Ginger Lemon Iced Tea
Whether it’s summertime or the middle of the winter, it’s extremely important to stay hydrated. I like to stay hydrated in a  number of ways, including drinking fresh, filtered water, infusing my water with high frequency hydrosols, like rose water as well as drinking fruit-infused water. I also like to maintain a very hydrating diet by eating mostly water-rich foods like fruits and vegetables.

Incorporating teas into your lifestyle, made with a wide range of herbs and spices, is a great way to stay hydrated as well benefit from the many different healing qualities that various plant medicines have to offer. There are so many healing plants that traditions all over the world have benefited from in the form of teas.

Ginger is one of the healing herbs I turn to quite often. Ginger is commonly used medicinally to help a wide range of symptoms. It’s used for nausea, a range of digestive issues like helping to relieve an upset stomach and morning sickness and can help soothe a sore throat. I find ginger to be quite comforting in times of sickness.

Making teas is easy. I start by simmering freshly cut ginger in a pot on the stove with filtered water. You can add any herbs you like. Today, I made a ginger, lemongrass tea. I personally like to simmer on low heat for a longer period of time, rather than bringing to boil. In the summer I also recommend making sun teas, where you place the herbs of choice in a jar and allow the energy and heat from the sun to do all the work, as the herbs slowly infuse the water.

I’ve also talked about the benefits of drinking lemon water first thing in the morning and love the way lemon and ginger taste together –truly a match made in heaven. After the lemongrass and ginger have simmered on the stove for about 30 minutes (sometimes it requires adding in more water) I personally love to add a squeeze of fresh lemon juice as well as a little bit of raw, local organic honey. It’s been hot here in Hawaii this winter, so I allowed it to cool on the stove for several hours and then added ice to make an iced-tea, but you can certainly enjoy this healing tea both hot or cold.

Enjoy!

Aloha from the Big Island of Hawaii,

Laura Dawn

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