Star Fruit

Star Fruit

Thanks to the handy wikipedia site, I now know that the aptly nicknamed star fruit is really known as carambola, native to parts of Southeast Asia. Thankfully, this tropically fruit thrives in Hawaii and is currently in season on the Big Island. Living a low-fat, raw vegan lifestyle, a typical breakfast for me (with star fruit in season) looks like: a plate full of about 6-9 star fruit and I’ll eat as much of this one fruit until I’m comfortably full. Star fruits are so juicy and have such a subtle and delicately sweet flavor. I love eating what’s growing locally and in abundance. 

The entire fruit is edible, except the seeds. Star fruit has a slightly waxy textured skin, and the inside flesh is firm, crunchy and extremely juicy – quenching any thirst. Its high water content and high content of insoluble fiber makes this fruit easy to digest, and helps maintain proper function of the bowels, speeding elimination time. Almost all fruit shares these characteristics, making them the perfect food to predominate any healthy diet.

Macronutrient Breakdown of Star Fruit

Compared to many fruit, star fruit has a higher than average protein and fat content, ranking in at:

  • Carbohydrates: 80%
  • Protein: 11%
  • Fat: 9%

Like almost all fruit, star fruit is the perfect food to eat on low-fat, raw vegan diet as it fits the recommended target of at least 80% fats, 10% protein and 10% fat (also referred to as 80/10/10).

Star fruit is extremely high in vitamin C. Consuming one cup of star fruit (about 130 grams) would yield you 45.4 mg of vitamin C, that’s over 75% of our daily requirement in only one cup!

Buying, Picking and Storing Star Fruit

It’s best to pick star fruit fresh, when it is ripe, but if you buy it when it’s still green, it will ripen into a nice yellow color. Make sure to turn the non-ripe fruit at least once a day. If you’re choosing them at a market, pick nicely colored yellow (or orangish) star fruit that are firm. You don’t want the fruit to feel soft to the touch. Avoid buying star fruit if it’s turning brown, but if it’s just the ridges that are brown, you can easily just cut along the outer ridges. You can also cut the ridges off if they’re still a little green.

Hope you all get a chance at some point to try this delicious fruit. If you’d like to learn how to transition to a raw vegan lifestyle and would love to come to Hawaii, check out our raw food Hawaii retreats.

Aloha from the Big Island of Hawaii!

Laura Dawn

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